13th Annual Kirk Douglas Award Honoring Hugh Jackman

Santa Barbara International Film Festival (SBIFF) honors Academy Award nominee Hugh Jackman with the 13th annual Kirk Douglas Award for Excellence in Film. The award will be presented at a black-tie Gala dinner at The Ritz Carlton Bacara, Santa Barbara (8301 Hollister Ave.) on Monday, November 19.

Jackman is best known for Oscar-nominated films The Greatest Showman and Les Miserables, and for starring as Wolverine in The X-Men franchise. Jackman will next be seen in Jason Reitman’s The Front Runner, in theaters this month.

“I am delighted that Hugh Jackman will receive the 13th annual Kirk Douglas Award. He’s an exceptional talent of stage and screen, and one of the nicest people in the business. It’s my honor to have my name linked with his on this year’s award,” states Douglas.

Since 2006, the annual Kirk Douglas Award for Excellence in Film has been awarded to a lifelong contributor to cinema through their work in front of the camera, behind, or both. Past honorees include Dame Judi Dench, Warren Beatty, Jane Fonda, Jessica Lange, Forest Whitaker, Robert DeNiro, Michael Douglas, Harrison Ford, Quentin Tarantino, Ed Harris and John Travolta.

The black tie event is a fundraiser for SBIFF’s educational programs. For tickets and additional information, visit http://sbiff.org/events/kirk_douglas_award/.

Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on November 12, 2018.

Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art at MCASB

Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art , Installation view at SITElab, SITE Santa Fe, NM, October 7, 2017 - January 10, 2018, Photo: Eric Swanson.

Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art , Installation view at SITElab, SITE Santa Fe, NM, October 7, 2017 – January 10, 2018, Photo: Eric Swanson.

The new exhibit opening this weekend at Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB), “Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art,” is a series of light-boxes and video animations by Oakland-based artist Kota Ezawa that chronicles some of the most infamous and high-profile museum heists in history. At the heart of this exhibition is a series of images paying homage to the 13 artworks—including those by Degas, Manet, Rembrandt and Vermeer— stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 1990.

Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art , Installation view at SITElab, SITE Santa Fe, NM, October 7, 2017 - January 10, 2018, Photo: Eric Swanson.

Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art , Installation view at SITElab, SITE Santa Fe, NM, October 7, 2017 – January 10, 2018, Photo: Eric Swanson.

Ezawa’s digital interpretations of the stolen masterpieces are presented to scale and illuminated in light-boxes that serve as modern apparitions of the centuries-old works. According to MCASB, “These technological vestiges are at once copies of the originals, while also carrying the mark of Ezawa’s animated hand. Reduced to flat planes of color, the original paintings take on new life as Ezawa plays with ideas of appropriation and originality.”

Kota Ezawa, Still from Exquisite Corpse , 2017, Single-channel color video, Courtesy the Artist; Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; and Haines Gallery, San Francisco.

Kota Ezawa, Still from Exquisite Corpse , 2017, Single-channel color video, Courtesy the Artist; Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; and Haines Gallery, San Francisco.

Also on display with the light boxes are video works, including a black and white reproduction of the security footage of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist.

“My prior drawings exclusively used photographs as source material. This series for the first time draws upon painting only to recognize that painters before 1850, like Rembrandt and Vermeer, were essentially the photographers of their time. In the absence of photographs, their paintings take on the task of recording reality with the scrutiny and minuteness that we now expect from cameras,” says Ezawa. “In this way, the new series extends my project ‘The History of Photography Remix’ into the pre-photography age of images. In addition, I feel compelled to produce an exhibition dealing with ‘stolen artworks’ because my own process could be regarded as a form of image theft. One could say I’m hoping to steal these images back and give them a new life.”

Kota Ezawa, Still from Exquisite Corpse , 2017, Single-channel color video, Courtesy the Artist; Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; and Haines Gallery, San Francisco.

Kota Ezawa, Still from Exquisite Corpse , 2017, Single-channel color video,
Courtesy the Artist; Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; and Haines Gallery,
San Francisco.

“In the absence of the original works, viewers must rely solely on reproductions of the lost Stewart Gardner paintings. Whether printed in a textbook, projected in a lecture hall, or gathered from Google image search results, artwork reproductions are ubiquitous. In this way, Ezawa asks: what does it mean to be original?” say the Organizers.

Kota Ezawa, Empty Frame , 2015, Duratrans transparency and LED lightbox, 24 x 33 in., Courtesy the Artist; Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; and Haines Gallery, San Francisco.

Kota Ezawa, Empty Frame , 2015, Duratrans transparency and LED lightbox,
24 x 33 in., Courtesy the Artist; Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; and Haines Gallery, San Francisco.

Ezawa’s work has been shown in solo exhibitions at SITE Santa Fe (2017), Albright Knox Art Gallery, Buffalo, NY (2013), Vancouver Art Gallery Offsite (2012) and Hayward Gallery Project Space, London (2007), as well as in recent group

Kota Ezawa, Munch Theft , 2017, Duratrans transparency and LED lightbox, 40 x 50 in., Courtesy the Artist; Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; and Haines Gallery, San Francisco.

Kota Ezawa, Munch Theft , 2017, Duratrans transparency and LED lightbox, 40 x 50 in., Courtesy the Artist; Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica; and Haines
Gallery, San Francisco.

exhibitions at Hamburger Kunsthalle (2018); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2017); Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid, Spain (2017); and San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2016). Ezawa’s work has earned a number of awards, including the SECA Art Award of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (2006), a Eureka Fellowship from the Fleishhacker Foundation (2010), and a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Biennial Award (2003). His work is included in renowned collections such as: Museum of Modern Art, New York; Metropolitan Museum of Art; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; and Kunsthalle Bremen, among others.

Kota Ezawa: The Crime of Art  was curated by Irene Hofmann and organized by SITE Santa Fe with the Mead Art Museum.

The opening reception is Saturday, November 10, from 6 – 8 p.m., with a special discussion session, “In Conversation: Kota Ezawa with Curator Irene Hofmann,” that evening from 5-6 p.m.  The show will remain on view through February 3, 2019 at MCASB, 653 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, mcasantabarbara.org.

Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on November 9, 2018.

Paths of Gold: Japanese Landscape and Narrative Paintings from the Collection

Views of Itsukushima and Wakanoura (detail), Japanese, Edo period, mid-17th century. Ink, color, and gold leaf on paper; pair of six-panel folding screens. SBMA, Museum Purchase, Peggy and John Maximus Fund.

Views of Itsukushima and Wakanoura (detail), Japanese, Edo period, mid-17th century. Ink, color, and gold leaf on paper; pair of six-panel folding screens. SBMA, Museum Purchase, Peggy and John Maximus Fund.

Choice selections from Santa Barbara Museum of Art‘s extensive Japanese painting collection are on view beginning Saturday, November 10, in the new exhibit Paths of Gold: Japanese Landscape and Narrative Paintings from the Collection.

Traditional Japanese houses were constructed of wood with paper windows and doors, and rice-straw matting (tatami mats) covering the floors. Each room—separated by sliding door panels—was like a virtual blank slate that could be repurposed and redecorated to suit each purpose, and, for certain occasions, could be outfitted with glistening screens and objects of color and gold.

Screens were changed seasonally or commissioned specifically for a celebration, a gathering of like minded friends, or a political assembly. A gilded screen enhanced the ambient light in a room, and at the same time, impressed, or even humbled visitors as it reflected the wealth or status of the patron.

Crows in Early Winter (detail), Kishi Chikudō, Japanese, 1826-1897. Ink and color on gold ground; pair of six-panel folding screens. SBMA, Museum purchase with funds provided by Lord and Lady Ridley-Tree, Priscilla Giesen, and special funds.

Crows in Early Winter (detail), Kishi Chikudō, Japanese, 1826-1897. Ink and color on gold ground; pair of six-panel folding screens. SBMA, Museum purchase with funds provided by Lord and Lady Ridley-Tree, Priscilla Giesen, and special funds.

This exhibition examines the aesthetics of Japanese art within both private and public interiors by showcasing nine folding screens, two scroll paintings, and examples of lacquerware selected from the permanent collection, supplemented by two local loans. Paths of Gold features screens dating from the 16th through the 19th centuries, at the end of which Japan opened to European and American trade.

Among the treasures in the exhibition is a lavishly decorated 17th-century set of three handscrolls, attributed to Tosa Mitsuoki (1617–1691). Painted with exquisite mineral pigments and gold, The Tale of Bunshō narrates a story about the rise of the merchant class and the struggles of women. On display as well are a hanging scroll and screen paintings from the Meiji era (1868–1912), a time when formats and subjects were introduced for the newly-conceived public exhibition hall. Also on display are examples of lacquerware from the collection, decorated with various gold techniques, adding to the multi-faceted painterly splendor in the Japanese interior.

This exhibition is co-curated by Hollis Goodall, Curator of Japanese Art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and Susan Tai, Elizabeth Atkins Curator of Asian Art at SBMA. It is on view November 10, 2018 – February 10, 2019. The Santa Barbara Museum of Art is located at 1130 State St. in downtown Santa Barbara. It is open Tuesday – Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., with Free Thursday Evenings from 5 – 8 p.m. For more information, call 805/963-4364, or visit www.sbma.net.

Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on November 9, 2018.

Jeff Goldblum and The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra

Jeff Goldblum, photo by Universal Music Paridukovic, courtesy UCSB Arts & Lectures.

Jeff Goldblum, photo by Universal Music Paridukovic, courtesy UCSB Arts & Lectures.

Jeff Goldblum is a man of many talents. The Academy Award-nominated actor reveals his jazz piano skills with his longtime jazz quintet The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures  on Sat., Nov. 3,  at 8 p.m. at UCSB Campbell Hall.

“The bass, sax and drums complement Goldblum’s piano prowess and electric personality for a high-energy traditional jazz music performance that brings the audience to its feet, while Goldblum’s quirky, intelligent and suave humor makes for a hilarious and captivating evening. Goldblum’s fans will delight in his banter, games and selfies as he works the room,” according to A&L.

“You haven’t truly heard your name until you’ve heard Jeff Goldblum say it,” Los Angeles Magazine says. “The 65-year-old actor loves savoring–and sometimes butchering–names when he works the room at Rockwell Table & Stage in Los Feliz. Goldblum’s signature, oft-imitated speaking style has a bebop quality: a swingin’ rhythm and distinct musicality, punctuated with those jazzy ‘uh’s and ‘um’s.”

While Goldblum and his jazz band have been making weekly appearances at Rockwell for years, only recently has he decided share this insiders’ club experience with those of us a bit father afoot. On his first-ever formal tour with The Mildred Snitzer Orchestra, Jeff Goldblum will bring that intimate jazz club experience to Santa Barbara. The music is first-rate jazz, but if part of the appeal is to get some of that Jeff Goldblum charm, we suggest that you don’t stray too far during intermission.

For Tickets/Info call 805/893-3535,  or visit ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu.

Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on November 1, 2018.

Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation Exceeds Fundraising Goal

Justin Fox, lead singer of Dishwalla, performs a song with TBCF children, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

Justin Fox, lead singer of Dishwalla, performs a song with TBCF children, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation’s (TBCF) annual Gold Ribbon Campaign and Luncheon was a deservedly huge success. The September fundraising campaign and October 4 benefit yielded $494,000 to benefit TBCF’s education advocacy, emotional support and financial stability programs.

The gathering at Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore Santa Barbara was a lovely al fresco luncheon and incredibly heartwarming program to celebrate and support the work of TBCF, the only nonprofit organization that provides financial, emotional and educational assistance to families who have a child with cancer in Santa Barbara, Ventura and San Luis Obispo counties. Guests had the opportunity to bid on a unique range of items in a silent auction, including beautiful pieces from Carol Burnett’s cherished silver collection.

TBCF Executive Director Lindsey Leonard spoke about many of the young recipients she had met throughout the year, some who went on to beat their struggle with cancer, others who tragically did not beat the disease. “One thing that everyone here today has in common is the desire to help others,” said Leonard. “Everyone has chosen to give of their time and resources because you know our sick children need you because they are literally fighting for their lives.”

TBCF Encouraging Youth Philanthropy program participants were introduced by the Luncheon’s Premier Sponsor, Earl Minnis. Courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

TBCF Encouraging Youth Philanthropy program participants were introduced by the Luncheon’s Premier Sponsor, Earl Minnis. Courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

An inspiring group of young philanthropists who participated in TBCF’s Encouraging Youth Philanthropy program—which guides youth from elementary school through college ages through facilitated fundraisers of their choice, from concept to implementation to delivering the oversized check—were introduced by Premier Sponsor Earl Minnis. Some of the youth included: Dayne Carlson, who hosted bake sales, collected recyclables and raised funds through a percentage of his mother’s business income; Lily Groves, the youngest participant at age 8, who hosted a series of lemonade stands in her neighborhood; Isa Mireles & Talia Gerstenfeld, who produced a musical showcase featuring some of the best youth talents in Santa Barbara; Chloe & Griffin Kossen, who hosted a kick-a-thon event at their Hapkido studio; Alisha Mergaliyeva, who sold handmade art on Etsy; Reese Termond, who is organizing a dance showcase at her ballet studio; Ava Schuette, who donated her babysitting money to TBCF; Mia Young & Sarah Thielst, who started the Teddy Bear Club at San Marcos High School and hosted a series of bake sales at football games; Bella, Savannah & Paloma Valenzuela, who hosted a series of bake sales at Vons and at Isa & Talia’s Musical Showcase; and Sylvia Gilbar, Kian & Nica Greene and Sofia Tasca, who all raised funds online using Facebook and Mobile Cause. Together through their heroic efforts, these big-hearted young members of our community raised $18,000.

Attendees also learned about TBCF’s work from a mother, Nicci Carter, whose family was a recipient. She shared a moving account of her experience, which began when her toddler Garhett was diagnosed with high risk neuroblastoma and began treatments at Cottage Children’s Medical Center—ultimately losing his courageous battle at the age of 3. “After our son died,” Carter tearfully recalled, “my husband and I showed up at the funeral home to make arrangements and were told that TBCF would be covering the cost. The organization also provided Christmas that year for our children who had just lost their brother. It came complete with the tree and gifts picked out specifically for each child. TBCF does everything they can to offer support not just for the child battling cancer, but for the siblings and parents too.”

Nicci Carter, TBCF mother from Santa Maria, shares a moving account of her experience with TBCF. Courtesy photo.

Nicci Carter, TBCF mother from Santa Maria, shares a moving account of her experience with TBCF. Courtesy photo.

With TBCF’s mission so vividly exemplified by the Carter family’s experience, the event emcee, Andrew Firestone, presented the opportunity for attendees to Fund A Family through items of descending value, such as a hotel room for a parent to stay near the hospital if they live far away.

The Rudolf Schulte Family Foundation was presented with the Heart of Gold Award, highlighting the Schulte family’s enduring support for TBCF kids and families.

The Rudolf Schulte Family Foundation from Santa Barbara was presented with the Heart of Gold Award, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

The Rudolf Schulte Family Foundation from Santa Barbara was presented with the Heart of Gold Award, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

The Trejos family, who received support from TBCF when Madix Trejos was diagnosed with ganglioneuroblastoma at age 5, was presented the Pay It Forward Award for their ongoing work to raise funds and awareness for local families who have a child battling cancer. Madix is 13-years-old now and doing great!

The Trejos family from Moorpark was presented with the Pay It Forward Award, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

The Trejos family from Moorpark was presented with the Pay It Forward Award, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

Robyn Howard-Anderson was presented with the Humanitarian Award for working in close conjunction with TBCF for more than a decade as the pediatric oncology social worker at Cottage Hospital, and later as the pediatric oncology social worker at Ventura County Medical Center.

Robyn Howard-Anderson (center left) from Ventura was presented with the Humanitarian Award, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

Robyn Howard-Anderson (center left) from Ventura was presented with the Humanitarian Award, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

The Helping Hands Award was presented to longtime friends Tracy Angel and Shannyn Tupper. In addition to serving on committees and coordinating events for TBCF, they started, and have continued to run, a Santa Barbara-North County beneficiary event, Sangria Soiree.

The Helping Hands Award was presented to Tracy Angel (left) and Shannyn Tupper from Santa Ynez, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

The Helping Hands Award was presented to Tracy Angel (left) and Shannyn Tupper from Santa Ynez, courtesy Teddy Bear Cancer Foundation.

It would have been difficult to match the feeling of warmth and spirit of giving, were it not for TBCF children coming together to end the program with a joyful song led by Grammy Award-winning musician Justin Fox, lead singer of Dishwalla. Fox had graciously been practicing with the kids, spending time with them in his studio to record the track.

Since its founding in 2002, TBCF has awarded more than $2 million in financial assistance to 2,142 individuals living in the Tri-County Region. For more information or to make a donation, call 805/962-7466 or visit teddybearcancerfoundation.org.

Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on October 30, 2018.

Happy Haunting in Downtown Santa Barbara

Skeleton Window at Lovebird, courtesy photo.

Skeleton Window at Lovebird, courtesy photo.

It’s a Happy Halloween season downtown this week!

The Halloween Window Décor Contest has Downtown Santa Barbara judges hitting the street to critique the spooky Halloween windows, and you can judge for yourself until October 31.

Be sure to keep an eye on Lovebird (535 State St.) – In celebration of Halloween they have replaced their mannequins with skeletons. Each day, they’ll dress the skeletons in new outfits and create a scene involving and promoting a local Downtown Santa Barbara business.

“This idea appealed to us because we want to support downtown and do what we can to help revitalize State Street while having a good time,” says owner Jennifer Scarbrough. “We’ll keep it up through November 3rd – Day of the Dead!” 

 Also in the mix is the annual Downtown Halloween Trick or Treat on Wednesday, October 31 from 3-6 p.m. for any and all kids in costumes. Bring your own treat bag and look for balloons and window signs for the Downtown businesses handing out treats.

For more information, follow @DowntownSantaBarbara on Instagram.

Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on October 27, 2018.

Cocktail Corner: Cheers to Chaplin’s Martini Bar

The perfect martini at Chaplin's Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

The perfect martini at Chaplin’s Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

A spirited toast to all things alcoholic! by Leslie Dinaberg

Looking for an intimate spot for a private tête-à-tête? The new Chaplin’s Martini Bar at the Montecito Inn offers a step back in time—to Charlie Chaplin‘s era—with a nicely curated menu of classic cocktails and a big dose of retro charm. 

Both the hour and the era are quickly forgotten when you step into this cozy lounge, which was briefly home to Frankland’s Crab & Co, is now a quietly sophisticated cocktail lounge. This new concept from Scratch|Restaurants Chef-Owners Phillip Frankland Lee and Margarita Kallas-Lee has a speakeasy vibe meant to hearken back to the Montecito Inn’s early days.

The "master of ceremonies" at Chaplin's Martini Bar mixes up a variety of golden era-inspired cocktails, courtesy photo.

The “master of ceremonies” at Chaplin’s Martini Bar mixes up a variety of golden era-inspired cocktails, courtesy photo.

At the center of the room, a “master of ceremonies” shakes and stirs a clever cocktail menu– including the perfect, old school martini. Also available are the gin-focused, 1920s-era Corpse Reviver #2 (Tanqueray Gin, Lemon, Pierre Ferrand Dry Curacao, Kina L’Aéro d’Or), Bee’s Knees (Tanqueray Gin, Lemon, Honey), French 75 (Tanqueray Gin, Lemon, Simple Syrup, Sparkling Wine) and Hanky Panky (Tanqueray Gin, Fernet-Branca, Carpano Antica).

The French 75 at Chaplin's Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

The French 75 at Chaplin’s Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

The late 1930s provide the inspiration for Scotch and Whiskey cocktail offerings: the Rusty Nail (Monkey Shoulder Blended Scotch, Drambuie, Angostura) and Vieux Carré (Old Overholt Rye Whiskey, Angostura, Peychaud’s Bitters, Carpano Antica, Vermouth Rouge, Pierre Ferrand 1840).

The Rusty Nail at Chaplin's Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

The Rusty Nail at Chaplin’s Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

From the 1940s – 1960s, Rum and Vodka cocktails are the center of attention, with the Kangaroo Kicker (Charbay Vodka, Carpano Dry), and Air Mail (Bacradi Superior, Mint Leaves, Honey Syrup, Lime Juice, Sparkling Wine).

The Air Mail at Chaplin's Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

The Air Mail at Chaplin’s Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

All of the craft cocktails are priced from $12 – $15 (a deal by Montecito standards), and a large selection of wine, craft beer and spirits are also available.   

“Margarita and I have been spending the majority of our time in Montecito at The Monarch (the excellent new restaurant at the hotel), and I have consistently been told by locals that they miss the previous bar that once occupied this space,” says Chef-Owner Phillip Frankland Lee. “I wanted to restore what many felt was absent, but with my spin; a place you’d want to get dressed up for, but where cocktails and conversation are ultimately your only focus.”        

The bar snacks available also have a retro vibe, and include French cheeses and Italian charcuterie, homemade sourdough and accoutrements; Endive Salad with candied walnuts and shaved apple; Jumbo Shrimp with a housemade cocktail sauce; Steak Tartare with cornichons, quail egg and shallots; and Local Oysters served On the Half Shell or Rockefeller style.

Oysters at Chaplin's Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

Oysters at Chaplin’s Martini Bar, courtesy photo.

It’s hard to believe that just weeks ago this place was brightly lit crab shack. The transformation is quite dramatic. Designed in collaboration with Montecito Inn Co-Owner and Designer Danny Copus, Chaplin’s design features warm tones, with wood-trimmed booths in tufted jet-black leather and dark, coffee-colored oak bar. 1960s era James Bond would be quite at home here—it feels like the perfect spot for an assignation.

“As we worked on the design, I wanted the room to feel like a secret; but one worth sharing with your friends,” Danny Copus. “Chaplin’s Martini Bar is a place where you can trade the limelight for candlelight, and we are very excited to have it here at the Montecito Inn.”

Chaplin’s Martini Bar, 1295 Coast Village Rd., Montecito, chaplinsmartinibar.com818/906-9609, open daily from 4 p.m. – midnight, without reservations.  

Cheers! Click here for more Cocktail Corner columns.

Leslie Dinaberg

When she’s not busy working as the editor of Santa Barbara SEASONS, Cocktail Corner author Leslie Dinaberg writes magazine articles, newspaper columns and grocery lists. When it comes to cocktails, Leslie believes variety is the spice of life. Send your suggestions to Leslie@sbseasons.com.

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on October 26, 2018.

Junior League of Santa Barbara Rummage Sale

JLSB Member, Kate Pellymounter, volunteers in the media department of the JLSB Rummage Sale, photo by Ashleigh Taylor Photography.

JLSB Member, Kate Pellymounter, volunteers in the media department of the JLSB Rummage Sale, photo by Ashleigh Taylor Photography.

The Junior League of Santa Barbara (JLSB) hosts its 82nd Anniversary Rummage Sale at Earl Warren Showgrounds on Saturday, October 27, with a special pre-sale event on Friday, October 26. A bargain hunter’s dream, the annual sale will be from 6 to 9 p.m. on Friday and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday. Tickets for Friday are $20 and available in advance online at JLSantaBabrara.org.

First established in 1934, the community-based sale is one of Santa Barbara’s longest standing charity events. It benefits the JLSB and provides low-cost, new and gently used merchandise to the community at affordable prices. Admission to the sale on Saturday is free and open to the general public. This is probably Santa Barbara’s largest indoor garage sale, with thousands of new, almost-new and gently-used items for sale such as baby items, clothing for all, art, housewares, appliances, furniture, kitchen and dining wares, and more!

Earl Warren Showgrounds is located at 3400 Calle Real in Santa Barbara.

Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on October 25, 2018.

Cocktail Corner: Brave & Maiden’s New Estate Winery and Tasting Room

Brave & Maiden Estate exterior, courtesy photo.

Brave & Maiden Estate exterior, courtesy photo.

A spirited toast to all things alcoholic! by Leslie Dinaberg

Wow. The breathtaking new Brave & Maiden Estate Winery and Tasting Room is definitely upscale and sophisticated. This is not your grandma’s winery for sure! This beautiful 70-acre estate, with a brand new state-of-the-art facility, brings an exceptional new wine experience to the Santa Ynez Valley.

Owner Rizal Risjad purchased the property in 2010 and, with his business partner and Managing Director, Jason Djang, established Brave & Maiden Estate in 2011.

Brave & Maiden Estate, inside winery, courtesy photo.

Brave & Maiden Estate, inside winery, courtesy photo.

“From the beginning, our vision for Brave & Maiden has been to become a world-class brand and we’ve never wavered from that,” said Djang, at a press preview event last month. “From our top winemaking team to our certified sustainable vineyard, the completion of our winery and tasting room is a giant leap towards making that vision a reality.”

The Brave & Maiden name is from the “Legend of Nojoqui,” a local version of the Romeo & Juliet story. Set at the nearby Nojoqui Falls, the legend recounts the story of star-crossed lovers who choose sacrifice over separation. According to the website, “inspired by such profound commitment, we’ve created a twofold and ambitious commitment of our own: to craft extraordinary wines and to share them with unforgettable hospitality.”

Brave & Maiden Estate exterior, courtesy photo.

Brave & Maiden Estate exterior, courtesy photo.

The 46-acre vineyard includes Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Syrah, Grenache and Sauvignon Blanc. Brave & Maiden is also a SIP certified sustainable vineyard dedicated to producing handcrafted, single-vineyard estate wines and red blends.

Under the direction of Winemaker and Consultant Paul Hobbs and Winemaker Josh Klapper, with Ruben Solorzano managing the vineyard, Brave & Maiden’s wines are committed to producing estate wines with the utmost level of quality and care. This attention to detail is obvious in Brave & Maiden’s new tasting room and 8,000-case production facility, which were designed by Backen, Gillam & Kroeger Architects, who are known for projects as Harlan Estate Winery, Larkmead Winery and Meadowood Napa Valley, Brave & Maiden is their first winery project on the Central Coast.

Tasting Room interior of Brave & Maiden Estate, photo by Jeremy Ball.

Tasting Room interior of Brave & Maiden Estate, photo by Jeremy Ball.

With stunning fireplaces, wood paneling and neutral earth tones, the impressive tasting room is spacious and comfortable, with indoor and outdoor seating areas and a private side area reserved for wine club members’ use. A huge sliding glass wall opens onto the expansive olive tree-filled courtyard between the tasting room and production facility, providing a great place to enjoy views of the picturesque vineyards and mountains.

Brave & Maiden offers three new wine experiences, all daily by appointment:

-a 45-minute Seated Tasting, where a dedicated host will guide guests through a curated selection of limited-production wines

-the Tour and Tasting option, offering a glimpse into the vineyard and backstage view of Brave & Maiden’s winemaking process, ending with a seated tasting

-the Tour, Tasting & Lunch, a two-hour elevated experience that includes a guided tour of the estate, followed by a seated tasting and gourmet lunch.

Brave & Maiden Estate, inside winery, courtesy photo.

Brave & Maiden Estate, inside winery, courtesy photo.

“With our new facility, our goal is to provide extraordinary experiences that are tailored to each individual guest, where they feel educated, entertained and cared for,” says Djang. “We couldn’t be more thrilled to share our journey and our wine with the community in an unforgettable experience of hospitality.”

“Brave & Maiden’s sustainably farmed vineyard is exceptional and I have no doubts the addition of the new winery and hospitality facility will further enhance and validate the brand’s presence in this world-class wine region,” shares Hobbs, who is somewhat of a legend in the winemaking world, as part of the initial team at Opus One, with a South American winemaking career that carries on today with his wines from Viña Cobos and his legendary status as the pioneer who launched malbec’s rise to fame. In additional to consulting projects, his impressive pedigree also includes being the owner and winemaker for Sebastopol-based wineries, Paul Hobbs Winery and CrossBarn, as well as his international partnerships, Viña Cobos (Cobos, Bramare, Cocodrilo, Felino), Crocus (Cahors, France), and Yacoubian-Hobbs (Armenia).

Brave & Maiden Estate exterior, courtesy photo.

Brave & Maiden Estate exterior, courtesy photo.

“We’ve invested all of ourselves in this project and are eager for guests to experience our wines first-hand. We strongly believe in the greatness of Santa Barbara County as a wine region and are privileged to be a part of it,” says Djang.

Brave & Maiden Estate is located at 649 N. Refugio Rd., Santa Ynez. For reservations, please call 805/693-2989, email reservations@braveandmaiden.com, or visit braveandmaiden.com.

Cheers! Click here for more Cocktail Corner columns.

Leslie Dinaberg

Leslie Dinaberg

When she’s not busy working as the editor of Santa Barbara SEASONS, Cocktail Corner author Leslie Dinaberg writes magazine articles, newspaper columns and grocery lists. When it comes to cocktails, Leslie believes variety is the spice of life. Send your suggestions to Leslie@sbseasons.com.

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on October 19, 2018.

Pebble Beach 
Takes Luxury to New Levels

A breathtaking view of Pebble Beach Golf Links, photo by Johann Dost.

A breathtaking view of Pebble Beach Golf Links, photo by Johann Dost.

As you step onto the greens, the beauty and drama of Pebble Beach simply takes your breath away. The fabled course celebrates its 100th anniversary in 2019 by hosting the U.S. Open Championships for the sixth time, and in preparation for the centennial milestone they’ve done loads of improvements and restorations on an already prime vacation destination.

An aerial of The Lodge at 
Pebble Beach and the 18th hole, circa 1920s. Photo courtesy, Pebble Beach Company Lagorio Archive.

An aerial of The Lodge at 
Pebble Beach and the 18th hole, circa 1920s. Photo courtesy, Pebble Beach Company Lagorio Archive.

Ranked the #1 public course in America by Golf Digest Magazine along with a #1 rating among the “Top 100 Courses You Can Play in the U.S.” by Golf Magazine, Pebble Beach Golf Links is certainly one of the greatest courses in the world, with a combination of coastal beauty, remarkable architecture and legendary golf history. Golf Digest Magazine describes the course as “not just the greatest meeting of land and sea in American golf, but the most extensive one, too, with nine holes [#4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, #17, #18] perched immediately above the crashing Pacific surf.”

After missing the Crosby Pro-Am from 1947-1950, Bob Hope finally showed up 
to play in 1951. Bing Crosby decided he’d better catch the 
moment on film. Photo by J.P. Graham, courtesy Pebble Beach Company.

After missing the Crosby Pro-Am from 1947-1950, Bob Hope finally showed up 
to play in 1951. Bing Crosby decided he’d better catch the 
moment on film. Photo by J.P. Graham, courtesy Pebble Beach Company.

Clint Eastwood was paired with Ray Floyd in 
the Crosby Clambake in 
the late 1960s. Photo by W.C. Brooks, courtesy Pebble Beach Company.

Clint Eastwood was paired with Ray Floyd in 
the Crosby Clambake in 
the late 1960s. Photo by W.C. Brooks, courtesy Pebble Beach Company.

We recently got to stay at The Lodge at Pebble Beach—in a gorgeous ocean view room overlooking the 18th hole—and indulged in the legendary guest experience that makes Pebble Beach so special. While golf is obviously King at Pebble Beach, for the non-golfers like me, the other elements are equally royal: starting with the absolutely stellar service. From the moment we rolled up to the door to check in—our road weary Honda taking its place of honor amongst the perfectly detailed BMWs and Teslas—we were treated with the type of gracious hospitality that every inn in the world should aspire to emulate. 

I never wanted to leave.

Our casually luxurious, coastally inspired room was comfortable yet completely lavish, with every amenity you could imagine—including full-size, top-of-the-line shampoo and conditioner, which I loved! The ocean-front patio was a perfect spot to enjoy the sunset, watch the whales spout, as if on cue, and toast to the decadence of this plum assignment.

Our room had been recently renovated to expand the window walls to maximize views of the course and the ocean and double the size of the patio and deck to serve as an outdoor living space, as well as new indoor furnishings and accessories, bathroom upgrades, a signature fireplace wall, air conditioning and technology upgrades including 55-inch HDTVs, new lighting, energy management systems and state-of-the-art door locks. The place may be 100 years old, but the rooms are up-to-date in every way imaginable.

Fairway One Cottage Room, photo by Sherman Chu.

Fairway One Cottage Room, photo by Sherman Chu.

Another recent addition is Fairway One, which added 30 oversized guest rooms and cottages fronting the first fairway of Pebble Beach Golf Links and a new meeting facility, as well as a 2,500-square-foot meeting room. 

“The Lodge and Pebble Beach Golf Links are where our story began in 1919, and now, as we approach our 100th anniversary, the addition of Fairway One will help us continue that legacy for the next 100 years,” says Bill Perocchi, CEO of Pebble Beach Company. The new section includes two gorgeous four-bedroom cottages with 1,000-square-foot living rooms with 17-foot-high wood-beam ceilings, wood-burning floor-to-ceiling stacked stone fireplaces, two king bedrooms, two queen/queen bedrooms, and an outdoor terrace with fire pits, as well as full kitchens.

 

Elizabeth Taylor celebrated her first honeymoon at Pebble Beach in 1950 with Conrad “Nicky” Hilton, Jr. Photo courtesy Pebble Beach Company Lagorio Archive.

Elizabeth Taylor celebrated her first honeymoon at Pebble Beach in 1950 with Conrad “Nicky” Hilton, Jr. Photo courtesy Pebble Beach Company Lagorio Archive.

What a perfect spot to make your home away from home. It’s almost enough to make you want to cook on vacation.

The other culinary options are also plentiful, with six restaurants onsite. Specializing in seafood, Stillwater Bar & Grill is an elegant destination for a relaxing dinner overlooking the fairways. The Tap Room serves a selection of American tavern-style classics, and The Terrace Lounge is a lovely spot to sit back and relax in one of the oversized armchairs while sipping on a cocktail and enjoying panoramic golf course views. Gallery Café offers home-style breakfast and lunch. For cove and ocean views, enjoy lunch at The Beach Club. The Bench is a casual spot overlooking the 18th hole, specializing in crafted cocktails and wood-roasted dishes, with a large central bar and patio tables with fire pits to warm your al fresco dining experience and roast marshmallows for símoreís.

If that’s not enough to entertain you, there’s a free shuttle service to sister property The Inn at Spanish Bay, offering another six dining options.

Guests are also provided complimentary access to The Beach & Tennis Club at Pebble Beach, a swanky venue near the renowned 17th hole, featuring tennis, workout facilities and a heated pool. Then there’s The Spa at Pebble Beach—one of only 56 spas in the world to receive the coveted Forbes Five-Star Award—offering an array of blissful body treatments that incorporate the healing properties of plants, herbs and minerals indigenous to the Monterey Peninsula.

The Spa at Pebble Beach, photo by Scott Campbell.

The Spa at Pebble Beach, photo by Scott Campbell.

Pebble Beach’s gorgeous 17-Mile Drive—one of the most scenic rides in the world, encompassing both stunning natural beauty and incredible architecture—is always one of the highlights of a visit to the area, and as guests of The Lodge at Pebble Beach we were able to do the drive in style, test driving a brand new Lexus sports car. 

Is it any wonder we didn’t want to leave? I may have to take up golf as an excuse to visit again soon.

For reservations or more information, call 800/654-9300 or visit pebblebeach.com.

Leslie Dinaberg

This story was originally published in the Fall 2018 issue of Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine.