AIA Santa Barbara’s 10th Anniversary ArchitecTours

“Rediscover Downtown Santa Barbara – Imagine How You Can Live, Work & Play” at AIA Santa Barbara’s 10th Anniversary ArchitecTours on October 6.

The American Institute of Architects Santa Barbara‘s 10th anniversary ArchitecTours event will celebrate the fabric of Santa Barbara’s downtown, including historic properties, hidden gems, and recent additions. Join them on this walking tour of downtown Santa Barbara.

“There have been many conversations recently about the changing face of downtown Santa Barbara and how best to support its vitality, while making it more vibrant, livable, and welcoming. This year’s tour is designed to expand these discussions by exploring downtown housing, business and entertainment through its architecture. Some of the sites on the tour will have interactive stations for discovering the concepts that came from last year’s AIASB “Make State Street Work” collaborative charrette. You are invited to contribute your thoughts, experiences, and discussions while exploring the heart of downtown and its architecture,” say the organizers.

Tour Sites:

1. Alhecama Theatre

The Alhecama Theatre was built after the 1925 earthquake that left downtown Santa Barbara irreparably damaged. Following the disaster, a large-scale construction effort completely altered the character of the city center. Originally known as the Pueblo Theatre, the building was constructed in 1925 for the Santa Barbara School of the Arts. It has been in continuous use ever since. A recent remodeling project was completed in 2017 and includes a new roof, an accessible ramp and pathway, doors that open to the plaza, and completely restored interiors with original oak floors, a fully restored stage, new lighting, and drapes on custom historically accurate rods. A professionally restored mural by the noted California artist Ross Dickinson dominates the main wall of the audience space. Today, the Theatre is an inviting space, and a strong step towards revitalizing the historic plaza and bringing art into the community.

Architecture: Harrison Design

Photography: Jim Bartsch

Harrison Design, Alhecama Theatre, photo by Jim Bartsch.

Harrison Design, Alhecama Theatre, photo by Jim Bartsch.

2. Anacapa Studios

Anacapa Studios is a three-building mixed-use complex in Downtown Santa Barbara. Envisioned as a “creative compound” for living and working, Robin Donaldson AIA, Partner of ShubinDonaldson (SD) Architects developed the live-work campus for his Santa Barbara design office, while enabling him to live on campus and truly integrate his personal life with his life-long passion for Architecture. Anacapa Studios stitches into the historically commercial and manufacturing neighborhood by minimizing the mass of the project, breaking the 12,000 SF development into three separate buildings which are three stories tall with fourth story roof decks. The ultimate goal of Anacapa Studios is to be a demonstration project and catalyst for future Santa Barbara downtown living.

Architecture: ShubinDonaldson

Photography: Jim Bartsch

ShubinDonaldson, Anacapa Studios, photo by Jim Bartsch.

ShubinDonaldson, Anacapa Studios, photo by Jim Bartsch.

3. Arlington Village

Arlington Village is the first new rental project to emerge downtown in decades helping to fulfill one of the City’s goals of new rental housing. Originally the old Arlington Hotel, the site is directly adjacent to the historic Arlington Theater. The project design compliments the historic architecture of the theater, extending its surrounding Spanish-style village to the west. The new apartment building is three stories with 33 rental units, averaging 865 SF. The project features an exercise room, a parking garage, improved surface parking for theater patrons, and 984 SF of commercial offices on the ground floor. Central components are common courtyards and a public paseo. A “village green” is provided between the theater and the development. In addition, common and private courtyards are provided on the second, third, and rooftop levels. The 1,830 SF rooftop lounge has panoramic views of the Santa Barbara Mountains.

Architecture: RRM Design Group

Photography courtesy of Architecture firm

RRM Design Group, Arlington Village, courtesy photo.

RRM Design Group, Arlington Village, courtesy photo.

4. Cota + Salsipuedes

Cota + Salsipuedes is a 19,293 square feet three-story mixed on the edge of the funk zone. The project utilizes the Average Unit-Site Density Incentive Program and boasts 29 apartment units of an average unit size of 595 square feet on a lot just under a half acre within the Priority Housing Overlay. Many of the units have mountain or downtown views and range from the basic studio units to ampler two bedroom units. The design contrasts the traditional Spanish Revival architecture drawing from the more contemporary aesthetic of the funk zone. Through the use of strong striking lines wrapping the facade and the use of industrial materials and bold colors this building stands apart and creates its own identity.

Architect: Cearnal Collective 

Cearnal Collective, Cota+Salsipuedes, courtesy rendering.

Cearnal Collective, Cota+Salsipuedes, courtesy rendering.

5. El Zapato

This project has several comfortable units arranged around a small 50’x64’ downtown lot. The building is tucked between two industrial buildings, a parking lot, and a narrow and busy street.

The initial arrangement of the building was driven by the need for creating parking and a desire to preserve a beautiful Pink Flame Tree. Jeff Shelton arranged the buildings around an elliptical porte- cochère arch in the middle of the building.

Architect: Jeff Shelton, Architect

Photography: Alex Nye

Jeff Shelton, El Zapato, photo by Alex Nye.

Jeff Shelton, El Zapato, photo by Alex Nye.

6. Granada Penthouse

On the top two floors of the historic Granada Theatre Tower in the heart of the theatre district of downtown is a beautiful immaculate penthouse. The residence is a two bedroom, two full and two half baths with many more features. The resident’s office sits just off the private elevator lobby in the western corner of the tower. The master suite and an office are located along the central gallery of the home. The master suite faces out towards the expansive mountains. At the end of the gallery is the great room with views towards the southwest and southeast, and off the living room, stairs lead to the ninth floor of the tower in the mansard roof. The southern corner of the tower has a loft with a full bar connected to an exercise room. From the loft are stairs that lead to the rooftop deck of the tower. The views are spectacular with 360º flawless views of the city.

Architect: Cearnal Collective

Photography: Nick Parker

Cearnal Collective, Granada Penthouse, photo by Nick Parker.

Cearnal Collective, Granada Penthouse, photo by Nick Parker.

7. Impact Hub

Impact Hub Santa Barbara is a premier co-working office space, offering patrons state of the art shared and independent working spaces with extensive member benefits that serve to incubate local entrepreneurialism, philanthropy, and sustainable business modeling. Intended to enhance networking and collaboration, independent workstations are located in common thoroughfares while conference rooms and event spaces offer some level of transparency, via fixed glass, to the surrounding spaces.

Upon entry to the foyer, all members are greeted by a bustling bar specializing in one-of-a-kind wine varietals and gourmet vegetarian fare. An atmosphere intended to escalate conversation, interaction, and new introductions. The space also includes an outdoor area where members are able to meet, eat lunch, or work independently during all seasons. Located on State Street, in the core of downtown, the Impact Hub is an epicenter for ingenuity, innovation and passion, qualities that underscore our community’s pervasively entrepreneurial spirit.

Architect: ANACAPA

Photography: David Mendoza

ANACAPA, Impact Hub, photo by David Mendoza.

ANACAPA, Impact Hub, photo by David Mendoza.

8. Independence House

The Independence House is an adaptive re-use and conversion of a 1,776 square foot commercial garage structure into a 2,030 square foot, four bedroom residence. Extensive exterior decks adjacent to the new living spaces provide expansive Santa Barbara city views.

Architect: Arketype Architects Inc.

Photography: Joshua Curry

Arketype Architects Inc., Independence House, photo by Joshua Curry.

Arketype Architects Inc., Independence House, photo by Joshua Curry.

9. Jardin de las Rosas

Jardin de las Rosas provides 40 affordable one, two, and three-bedroom rentals units. In addition, it houses the Michael Towbes Community Center and the Jeanette Duncan Learning Center, which provide educational programs for children, workforce preparedness for adults. The architecture reflects classic Santa Barbara style complimented by drought-tolerant landscaping and an interior courtyard with a playground and a beautiful 35-foot mural by local artists. Jardin de las Rosas is one of the first projects approved through the priority housing overlay pilot program and a key implementation action of the City’s General Plan. Jardin de las Rosas allows dozens of Santa Barbara families to live close to downtown while adding energy to the Haley corridor.

Architect: RRM Design Group

Photography: Michelle C. Torres-Grant

RRM Design Group, Jardin de las Rosas, photo by Michelle C. Torres-Grant.

RRM Design Group, Jardin de las Rosas, photo by Michelle C. Torres-Grant.

10. Mini Craftsman Contemporary

Built at the turn of the Century, this 762 square foot cottage has been designated as a Structures of Merit in the historic Brinkerhoff district. Having been severely neglected for years, the Architect and current owners embraced the Historic quality of this one bedroom home to its historic originations. At the interior, Lori A. Kari created a great room experience through the removal of walls, exposure of the vaulted ceiling, and the addition of operable skylights. While there is limited outdoor space, two outdoor living areas were created for enjoyment at different times of the day. A modest cottage, the project provides an aesthetic and functional architecture for life downtown.

Architect: Lori A. Kari; Photo courtesy of architect

Lori A. Kari, Mini Craftsman, courtesy photo.

Lori A. Kari, Mini Craftsman, courtesy photo.

11. The Service Department

In response to the current retail environment, The Service Department is being transformed into an open concept, multi-tenant property, anchored by a brewery taproom, two restaurants, a separate craft cocktail bar and two micro-retail spaces. Designed by Kevin Moore Architect and developed by Miramar Group, the same team behind the popular Waterline property in the Funk Zone, the Service Department’s layout allows for multiple defined yet contiguous spaces, each opening into the others to encourage patrons to flow easily throughout. Featuring a transformed State Street frontage with a covered patio bar and common entrance, an emphasis on indoor/outdoor spaces, an expansive outdoor beer garden at the rear of the property and charming original architectural features, the Service Department i will be a welcoming new destination property on State Street.

For downtown Santa Barbara to be truly revitalized, Miramar Group believes that projects like the Service Department be envisioned and executed, projects that utilize innovative development and design strategies to attract quality, local-friendly vendors so that State Street can be reborn as Santa Barbara’s showpiece.

Architect: Kevin Moore Architect / Miramar Group, Inc. – Rendering courtesy of Architect

Kevin Moore Architect & Miramar Group, The Service Department, courtesy rendering.

Kevin Moore Architect & Miramar Group, The Service Department, courtesy rendering.

12. West de la Guerra

This underutilized half-acre site, located just a half block from Paseo Nuevo in Santa Barbara’s downtown, was a large parking lot with a small commercial building and a very old Norfolk Island pine. The owners wanted to expand the commercial space and build new courtyard housing behind, while preserving as much parking as possible. From the street it is comfortable but urban; providing 14 new homes in the downtown, from a mountain-view penthouse to three affordable units.

Architect: Cearnal Collective

Photography: Patrick Price

Cearnal Collective, West De La Guerra, photo by Patrick Price.

Cearnal Collective, West De La Guerra, photo by Patrick Price.

The walking tour will takes place on October 6  from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with a tour party from 4-6 p.m. For additional information about the tour and to purchase tickets, visit aiasb.com or call 805/966-4198.

Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons on October 3, 2018.

The Essence of Santa Barbara Style

BEAUTIFUL SPACES DON’T HAVE TO BE CONFINED TO A SINGLE DESIGN AESTHETIC. AS YOU’VE SEEN MANY TIMES IN THE PAGES OF OUR MAGAZINE, CHIC AND STYLISH HOMES COME IN ALL SORTS OF SHAPES AND STYLES AND SIZES. THE ONE FEATURE THAT THE MAJORITY OF THESE HOMES DO HAVE IN COMMON IS THAT THEY’VE BEEN DEVELOPED WITH THE CREATIVE GUIDANCE OF A PROFESSIONAL INTERIOR DESIGNER.

 

Here are projects from three of Santa Barbara’s top designers—Penny Bianchi, Jodi Goldberg and Ann James—that are as distinct and varied as the women themselves. From Ann’s Spanish sophistication to Penny’s French Country charmer and Jodi’s clean and serene Zen style abode, a refined sense of design and extraordinary attention to detail imbue each of these homes with a distinctive vision, combining beauty with comfort and livability, that imbues the essence of life in Santa Barbara.

Leslie Dinaberg, Managing Editor

Related Features: 

Sophisticated Spanish Style

Here’s Your Moment of Zen

Montecito Foothills Meet French Country Chic

This story was originally published in the fall 2018 issue of Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine.

Welcome to Jennabunkport

Writer Jenna McCarthy shows off her She Shack, Jennabunkport. Photo by Jenna McCarthy.

Writer Jenna McCarthy shows off her She Shack, Jennabunkport. Photo by Jenna McCarthy.

Writer Jenna McCarthy’s she shack is 140 square feet of home office heaven.

By Leslie Dinaberg

Living—and working—in a 100-year-old farmhouse certainly has its charms, but as her children grew bigger and houseguests came and went, writer Jenna McCarthy (Everything’s Relative, The Parent Trip, Lola Knows a Lot) longed for, as Virginia Woolf once wrote,”a room of one’s own.”

“I longed for a space that was all mine, somewhere I could sneak away to and write in peace, somewhere my kids wouldn’t be barging in every four minutes asking me if I know where their sparkly pink headband is or wanting me to referee such life-or-death arguments as ‘whose turn is it to hold the remote control,'” says McCarthy.

Author Jenna McCarthy is right at home in Jennabunkport, her writer's cottage. Courtesy photo.

Author Jenna McCarthy is right at home in Jennabunkport, her writer’s cottage. Courtesy photo.

When her husband, Joe Coito, suggested she needed a writer’s cabin, McCarthy was online looking at sheds in a heartbeat. Both spouses know their way around a tool belt—they once flipped a house on the TV Show Property Ladderso when McCarthy couldn’t find the perfect ready-made shed, they bought plans online and built it themselves. “We were able to do things like buy a reclaimed door and modify the plans to make it fit. We copied the siding and trim of our house so it would look as if my little shed had been on the property all along.”

Her husband built her a desk, and her daughters helped with painting, sanding and hammering. “My mother’s day present this year was a coat of primer,” she laughs.

The inside is warm, cozy, bright and filled with things that bring joy and inspiration, like the six-foot giant octopus they made from a canvas curtain.

Author Jenna McCarthy's daughter Sasha, with Syd the giant octopus that graces Jennabunkport. Courtesy photo.

Author Jenna McCarthy’s daughter Sasha, with Syd the giant octopus that graces Jennabunkport. Courtesy photo.

“We christened her Syd, and she’s one of my favorite pieces in Jennabunkport, the name we chose for my shed, because, yes, we name everything,” says McCarthy.

“I’ve always considered myself fortunate that I get to do what I love to do all day with my familyís enthusiastic support. Now I get to do it in my own little paradise, one that is far more than an office; it’s a 140-square-foot reminder of how lucky and loved I am. And it’s all mine.”

Another view of the interior of Jenna McCarthy's office, Jennabunkport. Courtesy photo.

Another view of the interior of Jenna McCarthy’s office, Jennabunkport. Courtesy photo.

This inspirational message graces the wall of author Jenna McCarthy's she shack, Jennabunkport. Courtesy photo.

This inspirational message graces the wall of author Jenna McCarthy’s she shack, Jennabunkport. Courtesy photo.

This story was originally published in the Fall 2016 issue of Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine.

Restoring Ranchito Bendito: An Edwards and Plunkett Classic

Ranchito Bendito artwork by Frank Serrano

Ranchito Bendito artwork by Frank Serrano

ranchito-bendito-montecito-magazine-article_fall-winter2010

This story was originally published in Montecito Magazine in Winter 2010.

Spanish Colonial Style: Santa Barbara and The Architecture of James Osborne Craig and Mary McLaughlin Craig

Spanish Colonial Style, photo by Matt Walla, courtesy Santa Barbara Historical Museum

Spanish Colonial Style, photo by Matt Walla, courtesy Santa Barbara Historical Museum

This retrospective exhibition, the first in 90 years, celebrates the publication of a monograph on the work of two seminal Santa Barbara architects, who happen to be husband and wife.

James Osborne Craig is widely credited with establishing the Spanish Colonial style in Santa Barbara. He left two buildings of such potency—even precocity, given his age—completed posthumously, that one suspects he would have given George Washington Smith ample competition if not for his premature death at the age of 33. One was Casa Santa Cruz, the house for Irene and Bernhard Hoffmann. The other was El Paseo, which set the standard for Santa Barbara’s architectural rebirth in the twenties and continues to be a reference today. His wife Mary McLaughlin Craig, indelibly linked with the houses of Plaza Rubio, followed in his footsteps and established her own identity as an architectural designer for 36 years.Spanish Colonial Style book

Spanish Colonial Style: Santa Barbara and the Architecture of James Osborne Craig and Mary McLaughlin Craig, written by the Craigs’ granddaughter Pamela Skewes-Cox and architectural historian Robert Sweeney, was recently published by Rizzoli, in conjunction with the Museum. The exquisite book includes a stunning collection of contemporary photos by Matt Walla.

Experience the exhibition premiere with a cocktail reception, comments by noted architect and author Marc Appleton, and book signing by the authors, Pamela Skewes-Cox and architectural historian Robert Sweeney.

Opening Reception
October 22, 5:30 p.m.
Experience the exhibition premiere with a cocktail reception, comments by noted architect and author Marc Appleton, and book signing by the authors.  Reservation required.

Lecture
October 23, 11 a.m.
Pamela Skewes-Cox, author Spanish Colonial Style: Santa Barbara and the Architecture of James Osborne Craig and Mary McLaughlin Craig, will give a presentation about the book and the lives of her grandparents.   Reservation required.

First Thursday
November 5, 5-8 p.m.
Join us to view the exhibition after-hours during Downtown Santa Barbara’s art walk.  Wine, music and family-friendly activities.

All events take place at the Santa Barbara Historical Museum, 136 E. De la Guerra St., 805/966-1601.

—Leslie Dinaberg
Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine on October 16, 2015.

My Santa Barbara | ArchitecTours: Every Building Tells a Story

Julia Morgan—the architect who designed Hearst Castle—said: “Architecture is a visual art, and the buildings speak for themselves.” That may be true, but the intriguing personal stories behind the nine buildings highlighted in the 2015 Santa Barbara AIA Annual ArchitecTours also have some tantalizing tales to tell. This year’s tour, themed “buildings with a story,” takes place on Saturday, October 3 from 10 a.m.–4 p.m., culminating with a festive party. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit aiasb.com or call 805/966-4198.

—Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in the Fall 2015 issue of Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine.

CL20: Modern suburban home addition prototype by Shubin + Donaldson Architects, courtesy AIASB.

CL20: Modern suburban home addition prototype by Shubin + Donaldson Architects, courtesy AIASB.

Contemporary art-filled residence by Bildsten Architecture and Planning, photo courtesy AIASB.

Contemporary art-filled residence by Bildsten Architecture and Planning, photo courtesy AIASB.

Craftsman bungalow by Blackbird Architects, photo courtesy SBAIA.

Craftsman bungalow by Blackbird Architects, photo courtesy SBAIA.

The Goodland Hotel by DMHA Architecture + Interior Design, photo courtesy SBAIA.

The Goodland Hotel by DMHA Architecture + Interior Design, photo courtesy SBAIA.

Gracious downtown living by Thompson Naylor Architects, photo courtesy AIASB.

Gracious downtown living by Thompson Naylor Architects, photo courtesy AIASB.

Luminous Santa Barbara County offices by DMHA Architecture + Interior Design, photo courtesy AIASB.

Luminous Santa Barbara County offices by DMHA Architecture + Interior Design, photo courtesy AIASB.

Mid-century modern library by PMSM Architects, photo courtesy AIASB.

Mid-century modern library by PMSM Architects, photo courtesy AIASB.

Modern cottage for multiple generations by AB Design Studio, photo courtesy AIASB.

Modern cottage for multiple generations by AB Design Studio, photo courtesy AIASB.

Tract house retread by Ensberg Jacobs Design, photo courtesy of AIASB.

Tract house retread by Ensberg Jacobs Design, photo courtesy of AIASB.

Editor’s Pick: Casa del Herrero Celebrates 90 Years

Casa del Herrero, courtesy photo.

Casa del Herrero, courtesy photo.

George Fox Steedman and his wife Carrie moved into their new home on June 29, 1925. Now we have a chance to celebrate “father of Santa Barbara style” George Washington Smith’s architectural legacy with a special garden party. Casa del Herrero, 1387 E. Valley Rd., Montecito. June 28, 4–7 p.m. 805/565-5653, casadelherrero.com.

Originally published in Santa Barbara Seasons Magazine, Summer 2015.

—Leslie Dinaberg

Pearl Chase Society Historic Homes Tour—Editor’s Pick for Spring

Pearl Chase Tour, photo by Steve Crozier

Culley House, photo by Steve Crozier

Several George Washington Smith-designed homes in Montecito take center stage in the annual Pearl Chase Society Historic Homes Tour. Between 1918 and his death in 1930, George Washington Smith designed more than 60 residential and non-residential structures, mostly in Santa Barbara, including a home originally designed for renowned violinist and composer Henry Eichheim, which is included on the tour and features rarely seen frescoes created by the famed Mexican muralist Alfredo Ramos Martinez.

Also on view is the Culley house (pictured), which is a bit of a departure from Smith’s earlier Andalusian-influenced designs, as it’s a rectangular structure with a cantilevered porch more akin to Monterey-style, which shows his influence becoming more Spanish Colonial than old-world Spanish. In addition, the bus-led tour stops at several other homes, where visitors can see Smith’s distinctive aesthetic first hand. Advance reservations are required. May 18, 11 a.m.–4 p.m. PearlChaseSociety.org, 805/961-3938.

—Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in the Spring 2014 issue of Santa Barbara SEASONS Magazine.

AB Design Studio Selected as New Architect for Children’s Museum of Santa Barbara

Aerial view of Santa Barbara Children's Museum, courtesy AB Design Studio

Aerial view of Santa Barbara Children’s Museum, courtesy AB Design Studio

The long-wished-for Children’s Museum of Santa Barbara takes another step forward with the selection of architects from AB Design Studio Inc. to complete the building, which was initially designed by the late Barry Berkus.

Affectionately dubbed “the sand castle,” the whimsical design features approximately 15,000 square feet of interactive exhibits including a rooftop sky garden with exhibits and viewing areas. The museum will also house a state-of-the-art theater for video art and a small classroom, as well as a museum store.

Expected to be Santa Barbara’s first LEED-certified museum, the innovative building will highlight its own features such as the use of repurposed blue jeans for insulation and several “kid-powered” exhibits.

 

Rooftop view of Santa Barbara Children's Museum, courtesy AB Design Studio

Rooftop view of Santa Barbara Children’s Museum, courtesy AB Design Studio

The building will be located at 125 State St. between Hotel Indigo and the Train Depot. According to a recent statement, the project is currently in the permitting stage and will start construction in the summer of 2014 with a plan to be open in 2016.

—Leslie Dinaberg

Originally published in Santa Barbara SEASONS on February 3, 2014.

MCA Santa Barbara Invites Architects To Do Anything But Architecture In New Exhibition

 

Atelier Manferdini, Arlecchino, December 2010- May 2012, CNC cut wood structure, CNC cut and folded aluminum panels with powder coating finish, and printed vinyl, 12 x16 x 4 ft., Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, Courtesy the Artist

Atelier Manferdini, Arlecchino, December 2010- May 2012, CNC cut wood structure, CNC cut and folded aluminum panels with powder coating finish, and printed vinyl, 12 x16 x 4 ft., Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, Courtesy the Artist

Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) welcomes six prominent Los Angeles-based architects as they present original designs that are anything but architecture. In “Almost Anything Goes: Architecture and Inclusivity,”  Amorphis LA, Atelier Manferdini, Ball Nogues Studio, Design Bitches, DO/SU Studio Architecture and Variate Labs present their work,  embracing cross-fertilization, collaboration and adaptation to create new methodologies for research and implementation in the fields of architecture and beyond.

The exhibition is on view from January 5 –April 13.
The architects are:

Ramiro Diaz Granados, Amorphis LA
Elena Manferdini, Atelier Manferdini
Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues,Ball Nogues Studio
Catherine Johnson and Rebecca Rudolph, Design Bitches
Doris Sung,DO/SU Studio Architecture
Miles Kemp, Variate Labs

The opening reception for this exhibit is January 4 from 6–8 p.m. MCASB is located at 653 Paseo Nuevo.

—Leslie Dinaberg

 

Originally published in Santa Barbara SEASONS on December 31, 2013.